General Chemistry I - Chemistry 127

General Chemistry I - Chemistry 127



General Chemistry I - Chemistry 127


Lecture Notes
Chemistry 127: General Chemistry I
These notes are designed to cover what I will be writing on the board during
the video lectures. You should have these notes in front of you when you
watch. The idea is to give you more time to think about what is being said
rather than scrambling to write down the notes. One disadvantage is that it
may be easier to gap out for awhile. To get the most out of video lectures you
will want to avoid this. Also, try to find a dedicated place and time to watch
without disctraction. In the videos I will say things that are in addition to
the notes so you will want to write those things down as well. The notes are
organized such that each chapter is a lecture. Watching the video lectures as
part of your study time for this class will leave the class time for more active
learning with group work and other in-class activities. It can not be stressed
enough that the group work is as important or even more important than the
lecture itself. Some problems you work on in groups will introduce concepts
that we do not discuss in lecture. You will be expected to know the group
material at the same level as the lecture material when it comes time for the
exams. So, make sure that you as an individual understand what your group
is discussing. Finally, the problem sets for each lecture are given at the end
of each section. These problems are due at the beginning of the next lecture
period.

Contents
1 LectureL1: Introduction 1
2 Physical and Chemical Properties 3
2.1 Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2.1.1 Pure Substances andMixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.2 Elements, Compounds andMolecules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.3 Physical Properties ofMatter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.3.1 Extensive and Intensive Properties . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.4 Physical and Chemical Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.5 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.6 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3 Measurement 10
3.1 Units ofMeasure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
3.1.1 Reporting Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.2 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.3 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4 Anatomy of the Atom and the Periodic Table 18
4.1 Basic Structure of the Atom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.2 Atomic Number, AtomicMass and Isotopes . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.2.1 Atomic number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.2.2 Atomicmass and atomicmass number . . . . . . . . . 19
4.2.3 Isotopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
4.3 The Periodic Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.3.1 Group 1A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.3.2 Group 2A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.3.3 The B groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.3.4 Group 3A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.3.5 Group 4A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4.3.6 Group 5A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4.3.7 Group 6A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4.3.8 Group 7A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4.3.9 Group 8A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4.4 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
4.5 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
5 TheMole 25
5.1 TheMole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
5.2 MolarMass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
5.2.1 Converting between grams andmoles . . . . . . . . . . 26
5.2.2 Percent Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
5.2.3 Empirical formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
5.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
5.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
6 Molecules and Compounds 30
6.1 Chemical Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
6.2 NamingMolecules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
6.3 GroupWork: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6.4 ProblemSet: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
7 Ions and Ionic Compounds 34
7.1 OxidationNumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
7.2 Polyatomic Ions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
7.3 Ionic Compounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
7.3.1 Naming Ionic Compounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
7.4 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
7.5 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
8 Chemical Equations and Stoichiometry 40
8.1 Balancing Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
8.2 Quantitative Relations in Chemical Reactions . . . . . . . . . 42
8.3 Mass Relations in Chemical Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
8.4 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
8.5 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
9 Limiting Reagents 47
9.1 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
9.2 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
10 Net Ionic Equations 51
10.1 Ions in Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
10.1.1 Electrolytes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.2 PrecipitationReactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
10.3 Net Ionic Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.4 Acids and Bases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.4.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
10.4.2 AWord on the Hydrogen Ion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
10.4.3 Reactions of Acids and Bases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
10.5 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
10.6 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
11 Redox Reactions 58
11.0.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
11.0.2 Redox reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
11.1 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
11.2 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
12 Concentration and Molarity 62
12.1 Concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
12.2 Molarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
12.3 pH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
12.4 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
12.5 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
13 Titration Reactions 68
13.1 Titrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
13.2 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
13.3 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
14 Energy, Heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics 72
14.1 Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
14.1.1 Conservation of energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
14.1.2 Work and heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
14.2 The First Lawof Thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
14.3 Temperature andHeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
14.3.1 Heat capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
14.4 Phase Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
14.5 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
14.6 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
15 Enthalpy 77
15.1 Work and the First Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
15.2 Enthalpy Changes for Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
15.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
15.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
16 Lecture L19: Calorimetry 81
16.1 Calorimetry and Heats of Combustions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
16.1.1 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
16.2 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
16.3 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
17 Hess’ Law 85
17.1 State Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
17.2 Hess’ Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
17.2.1 Heats of formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
17.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
17.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
18 Light 91
18.1 Electromagnetic Radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
18.2 The PhotonDescription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
18.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
18.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
19 The Fall of Classical Physics and the Bohr Model 96
19.1 Brief Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
19.2 Bohr’s Atomic Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
19.2.1 First attempts at the structure of the atom. . . . . . . 97
19.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
19.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
20 Atomic Orbitals 103
20.1 TheModern Theory of the HydrogenAtom . . . . . . . . . . 103
20.2 TheQuantumNumbers of the HydrogenAtom. . . . . . . . . 104
20.3 Visualizing the AtomicOrbitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
20.4 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
20.5 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
21 Multielectron Atoms and the Pauli Exclusion Principle 109
21.1 TheOther Atoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
21.2 The Pauli Exclusion Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
21.3 Electronic Configurations of Atoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
21.4 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
21.5 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
22 Periodic Trends 114
22.1 Periodic Properties of the Atoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
22.2 Shielding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
22.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
22.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
23 Lewis Dot Structures I 118
23.1 Fundamentals of Chemical Bonding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
23.2 Valence Electrons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
23.3 LewisDot Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
23.4 Chemical Bond Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
23.5 AlgorithmforDrawing Lewis Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
23.6 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
23.7 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
24 Lewis Dot Structure II 125
24.1 Formal Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
24.2 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
24.3 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
25 Properties of Chemical Bonds 128
25.1 Properties of the Chemical Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
25.2 ChargeDistribution in Covalent Compounds . . . . . . . . . . 129
25.2.1 Electronegativity and bond polarity . . . . . . . . . . . 129
25.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
25.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
26 The VSEPR Model 131
26.1 VSEPRModel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
26.2 MolecularDipoleMoments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
26.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
26.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
27 Valence Bond Theory 136
27.1 Valence Bond Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
27.2 Multiple Bonds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
27.3 Hybridization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
27.4 Multiple Bonds Revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
27.5 Representing the 3Dstructure ofmolecules . . . . . . . . . . . 139
27.6 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
27.7 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
28 Symmetry 143
28.1 Symmetry Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
28.2 Symmetry PointGroups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
28.3 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
29 Intermolecular Forces 146
29.1 Polarizability and Induced Dipoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
29.2 Intermolecular Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
29.3 PhaseDiagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
30 Hydrogen Bonding and Water 151
30.1 Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
30.1.1 TheGrotthussmechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
30.2 Acids and Bases Revsited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
30.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
30.4 Homework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
31 Ideal Gases I 156
31.1 Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
31.2 The Ideal Gas Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
31.2.1 Aword on units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
31.2.2 Ideal gas law in terms of density . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
31.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
31.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
32 Ideal Gases II 161
32.1 GasMixtures and Partial Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
32.2 Chemical Reactions BetweenGases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
32.3 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
32.4 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
33 Kinetic Theory of Gases 166
33.1 TheKineticMolecular Theory ofGases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
33.2 GroupWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
33.3 ProblemSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Lecture Notes
Chemistry 127: General Chemistry I

Αν σας άρεσε...

Αφήστε το σχόλιό σας από το Facebook!

Αγαπητοί φίλοι καλώς ήρθατε στο ψηφιακό σχολείο taexeiola

Στο blog αυτό θα προσπαθούμε συνεχώς να συλλέγουμε όσο το δυνατόν περισσότερα σχολικά βοηθήματα, λυσάρια, βιβλία, σημειώσεις κτλ. για τους μαθητές και τους εκπαιδευτικούς. Σκοπός μας είναι να βοηθήσουμε όλους εσάς που έχετε ανάγκη από βοηθητικά βιβλία και online video καθώς και τα σχολικά βιβλία δημοτικού, γυμνασίου και λυκείου. Βοηθήματα και βιβλία σε ηλεκτρονική μορφή σωστά αρχειοθετημένα ώστε να μπορείτε με ένα κλικ να βρείτε αυτό που ζητάτε εύκολα, γρήγορα και δωρεάν. Μακροπρόθεσμος στόχος μας είναι να δημιουργήσουμε ένα ολοκληρωμένο δωρεάν ηλεκτρονικό - ψηφιακό σχολείο για όσους το χρειάζονται. Τέλος θέλουμε να ευχαριστήσουμε θερμά όλους όσους προσφέρουν ελεύθερα τα βοηθήματα και τα βιβλία τους βοηθόντας όσους το έχουν ανάγκη. Όσοι εκπαιδευτικοί, φροντιστήρια ή εκδόσεις επιθυμούν να συμβάλουν στην προσφορά Ψηφιακών βοηθημάτων και εκπαιδευτικού υλικού και ταυτόχρονα να αναδείξουν το έργο τους, μπορούν να επικοινωνήσουν μαζί μας.
Να διευκρινίσουμε πως όλα τα βιβλία και βοηθήματα έχουν βοηθητικό χαρακτήρα. Στόχος τους είναι η βοήθεια του μαθητή και του εκπαιδευτικού και όχι η τυφλή αποδοχή των όσων αναφέρονται σε αυτά!
Επικοινωνήστε μαζί μας στο taexeiola@gmail.com. Επισκεφθείτε τις σελίδες μας στο facebook, στο twitter και στο Google+